Goo Goo Dolls
Daughtry

Plain White T's
Friday, July 18, 2014

Produced by Kesey Enterprises and Double Tee Concerts

All Ages General Admission Advance Tickets on sale now at all Safeway TicketsWest outlets, online at ticketswest.com, and the Cuthbert Box Office (show nights only) for $41.50, which includes a City of Eugene facility fee / parking.

Tickets day of show will cost $47.

Gates open at 5:30 p.m. Show starts at 6:45 p.m.

All tickets subject to service charges and/or user fees.

Goo Goo Dolls

After more than two decades as a band, with nine albums, a catalog of songs that have become ingrained in the pop consciousness and countless concerts for millions of fans, the Goo Goo Dolls are feeling particularly good about their new album: Magnetic.

More to the point, the Goo Goo Dolls are feeling particularly good. Period.

“This album was really upbeat and fun,” says John Rzeznik, the trio’s primary singer, songwriter and guitarist since it was founded in Buffalo in 1986. “I don’t think we’ve made a record like this in a while. Just had a great time doing it.”

It’s a great time overall for the musicians. Bassist Robby Takac, whose partnership with Rzeznik has been the band’s foundation since the start, and his wife have just had their first child. And Rzeznik is getting married this summer.

Not to mention that recently three of the band’s songs placed in Billboard’s Top 100 of 1992-2012, with “Iris” standing at No. 1. That song has also connected with a new generation, as Dolls fan Taylor Swift has been performing it in her concerts.

That joy is all there in the spirit of the 11 new songs on the album, for which Rzeznik, Takac and drummer Mike Malinin — the lineup steady since 1995 — recorded in New York, London and Los Angeles with Gregg Wattenberg (Train), Rob Cavallo (Green Day), John Shanks (Bon Jovi) and Greg Wells (Katy Perry). From the celebratory single “Rebel Beat” to the love-rediscovery ballad “Slow It Down,” from the blue-collar anthem “Keep the Car Running” to the meltingly romantic “Come to Me,” Magnetic is an album bursting with a spirit of renewal. And nowhere is it more explicit than in one of two Takac-penned songs: “Happiest of Days.”

“All the writing is an extension of ourselves,” Rzeznik says. “My life’s amazing. When I sit and think about my life, it really has been incredible.”

No argument from Takac.

“It’s pretty amazing to me,” he says. “All these years now we’ve been playing in this band together and we still somehow manage to grow. That allows us to keep making it happen. We never denied what the situation was at the moment. Right now we’re here and living this moment, and some cool things are happening in our lives.”

It’s a contrast from the poetically introspective tone of 2010’s Something For the Rest of Us, which reflected some personal turmoil.

“This album feels like this is where we came out the other side and are in the daylight again,” he says. “Got a little dark on the last record. But that was something I needed to do, where I was at. This is where I am now. Yeah, you know — I got myself up, brushed myself off and looked around, and things were fine. Why not celebrate?”

Daughtry

In the course of only five years, Chris Daughtry has had more than his share of career highlights. The singer, songwriter, and musician from North Carolina has released back-to-back No. 1 albums, the 4x-platinum DAUGHTRY (which became the fastest-selling rock debut in Soundscan history) and 2009’s platinum Leave This Town. DAUGHTRY has scored four No. 1 Top 40 hits (“It’s Not Over, “Home,” “Feels Like Tonight,” and “No Surprise”), earned four Grammy Award nominations (including “Best Rock Album” for DAUGHTRY), won four American Music Awards, and brought its electrifying live show to all corners of the world, including sold-out arenas in South Africa, Singapore, and The Philippines.

So when it came time to record their third album, Break the Spell, it would have been understandable if Chris and the band — which includes guitarists Josh Steely and Brian Craddock, bassist Josh Paul, and drummer Robin Diaz — decided to stick to what they knew worked. Thing is, that’s not how they work. “I didn’t want to make the same record,” Chris says of how he felt before the band hit the studio in March 2011 with long-time producer Howard Benson. “Howard called me and said he had some ideas for what we needed to do to differentiate this album. He said, ‘I really think we need to push ourselves.’ He was blown away by the songs we had sent over, which is very hard to do with that guy, so everything was really positive out of the gate.”

The result is Break the Spell — a gleaming showcase for Chris’s powerful, emotionally resonant voice and knack for relentless melodic hooks and big, anthemic choruses. The album enables the band to evolve musically while aiming to satisfy its many long-time fans. “Going in to the writing sessions, we said, ‘Let’s not try to sound like anything. Let's just write, and see what happens,’” says Chris, who co-wrote every song with either one of his band-mates or such collaborators as Marti Frederiksen, Busbee, and Brett James. “We came up with some pretty interesting tunes that sound nothing like anything we've done before. Even though some of them didn’t make the album, the process stretched us and took us to new places. It was the first time I’ve said, ‘It doesn't sound like us, but I can see us doing that.’"

You can hear their risk-taking on such primal, slithering rockers as hard-driving first single “Crawing Back To You,” “Outta My Head,” and “Renegade,” which Entertainment Weekly praised for its “wind-in-your-eyes hook and leather-glove-to-the-sky chorus” calling it “the ideal soundtrack for hitting the highway.” The songs reflect the confident swagger of some of Chris’ favorite bands. “I was listening to a lot of old Aerosmith and Def Leppard and I wanted to make a rock record that that was really upbeat and hard-hitting,” Chris says. “There were a couple of tracks on Leave This Town that were heavy, but as a whole, the album was very polished. Break the Spell is more fist-pumping, if you will. I wouldn’t say the songs are stripped-down, but they have a bit more room to breathe.”

That extra space has the effect of allowing the words to shine more brightly, which became important to Chris when he realized that some of the songs had gone deeper lyrically than anything he had written to date. The birth of his twins in November 2010 “definitely sparked something in me,” he says, and led to such moving ballads as “Gone Too Soon.” At one point during the writing session, Chris had to walk out to collect himself. “The song is about realizing that today could have been the day that someone would be blowing out the candles,” Chris says. “It just hit me pretty hard. I remember playing the demo for my brother and I turned around and he was bawling. I didn't realize that my brother’s wife had suffered a miscarriage years before. It was a pretty emotional moment.”

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